Questions

Welcome to RVForums.com

  • Register now and join the discussion
  • Friendliest RV Community on the web
  • Modern site for PC's, Phones, Tablets - no 3rd party apps required
  • Ask questions, help others, review campgrounds
  • Get the most out of the RV Lifestyle
  • Invite everyone to RVForums.com and let's have fun
  • Commercial/Vendors welcome
Joined
May 13, 2020
Messages
2
I have a 2013 F-150 with the 3.5 ecoboost with 3:55 e-locker rear end. I am new to camping and from everything I have read I should be able to tow the Salem cruise lite 273QBXL, 33ft 5956lbs (dry). I am also being told that my truck may struggle, conflicting I know. Any jelp would be appreciated.
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2019
Messages
177
Location
Where ever I park it
RV Year
2017
RV Make
Salem
RV Model
Hemisphere 346RK
RV Length
38'
The first thing to do is forget the DRY WEIGHT. You will never pull it at that weight. Look at the GROSS weight and figure 16 to 20 percent as the tongue weight. If your truck is rated to pull that much weight then think about the wind resistance. I do think your truck will be able to tow it, but you will certainly know it is there.
 
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
2,145
Location
WA, MT or somewhere else!
RV Year
2018
RV Make
Newmar
RV Model
Mountain Aire 4047
RV Length
40'
TOW/TOAD
2014 Honda CR-V
Good advice from @Gronk! With a 5,956" dry weight, I'm guessing you will be at least 7,500# when ready-to-travel. The rated Gross Weight of that trailer is 7,702. Your F-150 is going to work pretty hard pulling that amount of weight up steep hills. If you are OK with slow-going in the hills, it may work for you.

TJ
 
Joined
Apr 29, 2020
Messages
35
I agree with the other two posters. If you already have the truck, get something much more doable in weight for your truck. There are a ton of options. Bigger and heavier is not always better, though I used to think so. If it is just the two of you, I’d look at something much smaller with maybe an added awning room. If you need sleeping accomodations for four or more, try looking at a hybrid. Lots of sleeping space, but light weight.

When we got our 26’ Airstream, we were in the right specs for weights. The trailer weighed less than 5000 unloaded and the Tahoe wee were using had a trailering package and was rated for 8500 pounds. When we towed it home after purchase, my husband immediately went and purchased a gas F250. We used it for the years and just traded in for a dieself250. Now you don’t need a diesel or even an f250. That’s not my point. But we love not feeling like we are white knuckling everywhere and that was how we felt with the Tahoe because we had a wheelbase and length problem for the length of the trailer.
 
Joined
Jul 17, 2020
Messages
5
My experience in pulling a 7500 GVW trailer with a 1/2 ton pickup (in my case a new Silverado with the 3.0 litre diesel) is that you could get in trouble with your GVWR/cargo capacity on the tow vehicle. Factor tongue weight, any cargo and passengers into that number carefully. Look at axle weight capacity as well (all of this typically found on the driver's door jamb). You'll likely find you've got plenty of room on towing capacity, but little if any on cargo/GVWR. In my case I was under on all aspects (barely under on cargo, plenty of room with towing capacity), and the powertrain handled things beautifully. But the rear suspension would start galloping on rough roads and concrete panel freeways which made the drive unbearable. After a white knuckle cross-wind trip, I swapped in a HD2500 diesel as the tow vehicle, left the Silverado for daily driving and have not had a worry since. My lesson was that on-paper ratings are quite different than on road experience. Hope this helps!
 
Top