Do you think we could pull this off? Need advice..

Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
1
Hello RVers (is that a term? I’m new lol)

My husband and I are diving deep on YouTube watching rv living videos. It is something we consider very seriously. However our situation is not typical... so I’d appreciate some advice!

Long story short: we are in our late 20s, work from home, have 2 large dogs and 2 cats (I am ready to deal with the difficulties of RVing with pets), this is where it gets tricky... only way we can afford an RV is to sell our home. So we sell the house, buy an RV and off we go.

Ideally I don’t think we would stay anywhere longer than a week or two. So moving around, traveling. We don’t have a tow vehicle and probably won’t be able to afford one since a lot of $ will go to RV purchase. I’m guessing we will have around 30k after the house sale? Roughly.

So I’m guessing a motorized RV is better for us? Where’s a good place to look for RV purchase? Don’t want to buy from a lot. Would rather buy from folks who are switching back to house living or upgrading.

Should we sell our cars? Or keep one and keep making payments on it and tow it behind?

We make roughly 3-4 k a month for now, planning to grow of course, working everyday for better income.

Any idea how we can pull this off and IF we can pull this off?
 
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
903
Location
WA, MT or somewhere else!
RV Year
2018
RV Make
Newmar
RV Model
Mountain Aire 4047
RV Length
40'
TOW/TOAD
2014 Honda CR-V
First, welcome to RVF, @Kray_b; we're glad to have you.

I do admire your desire to think outside the box. And, lots of folks live full-time in an RV; some of them while working, so it is possible. Is it possible for you? Only you can answer that question. And, I strongly encourage to do your homework before making any decisions. This is not a decision for the faint-of-heart. :ROFLMAO:

Here are a few of the questions you need to answer BEFORE doing anything. How stable is your income? Could it suddenly drop...or, worse? Given your ages, what about the possibility of children? I don't need the answer to that question, but YOU do. Changes in income or family situation can be a real issue.

As for what type of RV, that's a personal choice. But remember, this will be your full-time home and a small RV can become pretty confining after a while for a lot of people. Then, there's the matter of a "tow vehicle." Even with a "motorized" RV, you will need a way to get to the store, doctor appointment, etc. Not having one can be pretty confining for many people. Taxis or ride-share transport can get expensive pretty quickly, and is not always readily available.

Remember, also, that it will cost nightly or weekly fees to park your RV where you have access to water, power and sewer. And, that there are fuel costs to consider as well.

I think your $30K budget is pretty light for a Class A or larger Class C motorhome suitable for full-timing unless you buy an older one. And, that brings with it the likelihood of frequent repairs and replacements. Motorhomes require tire and battery replacements every few years and the cost quickly runs into the thousands of dollars. Quite honestly, for a new motorhome that I would consider suitable for full-time living, that would probably be a minimum down payment. And, that means sizable monthly payments if you finance a coach.

Not trying to discourage you here, but you need to have some understanding that full-time RVing can easily cost as much as living in a sticks-and-bricks house, and comes with some additional issues. As I said in the beginning, you need to do the homework; work through all the issues and then make an informed decision. I'm sure others will be along to provide additional perspectives.

Good luck.

TJ
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 18, 2020
Messages
12
TJ hit the nail on the head. When we went full time, three years ago, because we were encourage by a turnpike going through our living room. We HAD to sell due to eminent domain. I would not wish that process on my ex-wife. Lucky for us, we had a good chunk of equity in the home. I don't think we could do this without a toad.
Crunch the numbers real hard and try to set aside at least $10K for unexpected things. There will be some of them. If you are mechanically inclined, you can save a lot of money by doing your own maintenance. You asked for advise and I think you are not in the right position to start this adventure. But it is a great goal to work towards. It is a great way of life and we enjoy it.
Best of luck
 
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