Tire Monitoring System

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Joined
Jan 20, 2021
Messages
1
I am looking for a recommendation for a TPMS. I have a Class B with 6 wheels and would like something easy to install and understand. Also, I would not want to have to rebalance the tires due to the weight of the sensors.
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2019
Messages
1,561
Location
Prince William, VA
RV Year
2020
RV Make
Newmar
RV Model
Ventana 4326
RV Length
43
TOW/TOAD
2020 Ford F-150
 
Joined
Jan 2, 2021
Messages
42
RV Year
2006
RV Make
Country coach
RV Model
inspire 360
RV Length
40
TOW/TOAD
2012 crv
I have used EEZ tire monitor system for two years with no problems. One word of advise. Follow the instructions to the letter. If you leave out a step it won't work.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2020
Messages
22
Location
Brandon, Florida
RV Year
2016
RV Make
Winnebago
RV Model
Adventurer 37F
RV Length
38'
TOW/TOAD
2018 Ford Explorer Platinum 4x4
Fulltimer
No
EEZ Tire is what I am using. Works great!
 
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
3,615
Location
WA, MT or somewhere else!
RV Year
2018
RV Make
Newmar
RV Model
Mountain Aire 4047
RV Length
40'
TOW/TOAD
2020 Lincoln Nautilus or 2014 Honda CR-V
EEZ Tire user here as well. (y)

TJ
 
Joined
Oct 21, 2020
Messages
53
The federal government mandated tire pressure sensors with new vehicles produced after 2005 and it was to reduce excess fuel consumption from underinflated tires and for no other reason. ABS, seat belts, safety glass, and engine governors were designed to make vehicles safer but not tire pressure monitoring systems.

My vehicles tire pressures increase with ambient temperaturs and with exposure to sunlight and from the flexing of the tires while driving and so it really does not matter at all if the tire is at 65P PSI or 75 PSI. If there is a severe leak it is obvious and all I need is a $15 tire pressure gauge to determine how fast the leak is draining air out of a tire. Regardless, the course of action is to go to a tire shop and have them remove the tire and fix the problem.

I have tire pressure monitoring that was installed by the factory on our three vehicles and it contributes nothing to driving safety. I don't have one on our Class C motorhome and never will have one as it provides no benefits to safety or fuel economy over what I get with my $15 tire pressure gauge.
 
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
3,615
Location
WA, MT or somewhere else!
RV Year
2018
RV Make
Newmar
RV Model
Mountain Aire 4047
RV Length
40'
TOW/TOAD
2020 Lincoln Nautilus or 2014 Honda CR-V
I don't have one on our Class C motorhome and never will have one as it provides no benefits to safety or fuel economy over what I get with my $15 tire pressure gauge.
That’s a pretty sweeping statement! How does your $15 tire gauge work for you at 60 mph? Tire failures don’t just occur when you are parked. And, can your $15 tire gauge tell you when a tire is overheating because it is losing air? I don’t think so.

The point is that a TPMS is not a tire pressure gauge, it is an early warning system that can tell you a tire is going down BEFORE it fails completely, allowing you time to come to an orderly stop rather than a dicey panic stop. Obviously, the choice is yours, but I know what my choice is.

TJ
 
Joined
Apr 3, 2021
Messages
25
Location
Ohio
RV Year
2015
RV Make
Thor
RV Model
Chateau 28Z
RV Length
A hair under 30'
Fulltimer
No
We have Tire Minder. Works great.
 

ARD

Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
466
Location
Fulltiming
RV Year
2018
RV Make
Newmar
RV Model
Dutch Star
RV Length
44
TOW/TOAD
Yukon Denali
Fulltimer
Yes
I don't have one on our Class C motorhome and never will have one as it provides no benefits to safety or fuel economy over what I get with my $15 tire pressure gauge.
Well, I will have to disagree that it doesn’t provide safety benefits. My EEZ TPMS saved me from a potential very bad situation. Driving up a mountain pass, my TPMS alerted me that one of the tires on my toad dropped pressure quickly. I pulled off the side to discover a flat on one of the front tires. Had I kept going any number of things could have happened including a fire from toad jumping to DP engine. I wouldn’t drive without one.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2019
Messages
686
Location
Frostproof, Florida
RV Year
2021
RV Make
Heartland
RV Model
Cyclone 4006
RV Length
44
TOW/TOAD
2021 F350 DRW
Fulltimer
Yes
The federal government mandated tire pressure sensors with new vehicles produced after 2005 and it was to reduce excess fuel consumption from underinflated tires and for no other reason. ABS, seat belts, safety glass, and engine governors were designed to make vehicles safer but not tire pressure monitoring systems.

My vehicles tire pressures increase with ambient temperaturs and with exposure to sunlight and from the flexing of the tires while driving and so it really does not matter at all if the tire is at 65P PSI or 75 PSI. If there is a severe leak it is obvious and all I need is a $15 tire pressure gauge to determine how fast the leak is draining air out of a tire. Regardless, the course of action is to go to a tire shop and have them remove the tire and fix the problem.

I have tire pressure monitoring that was installed by the factory on our three vehicles and it contributes nothing to driving safety. I don't have one on our Class C motorhome and never will have one as it provides no benefits to safety or fuel economy over what I get with my $15 tire pressure gauge.
I doubt you understand what a TPMS (tire pressure monitoring system) is. You are confusing it with the OEM system that most of our non-RV vehicles have on them where you will get that lame tire symbol on the dash when one of your tires are low.

For years commercial truck-tractor-trailers have been using TPMS's with external sensors so that they know when they blow a tire or one of their tires simply goes flat. Obviously it is a great piece of safety equipment to have on larger RVs for that exact same reason. If one of my 6 tires on my fiver start rapidly dropping pressure while I am going through Nashville at 70mph I would prefer to know it right away with an alarm going off on my TPMS. Without the system I would simply notice pieces of my blown tires tearing up the side of my fiver and possibly hitting other vehicles.

Calsun, if you are actually doing any serious traveling in an RV, or if you even own an RV, you should consider getting a TPMS because it is actually the #1 piece of safety equipment IMHO.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2019
Messages
686
Location
Frostproof, Florida
RV Year
2021
RV Make
Heartland
RV Model
Cyclone 4006
RV Length
44
TOW/TOAD
2021 F350 DRW
Fulltimer
Yes
Well, I will have to disagree that it doesn’t provide safety benefits. My EEZ TPMS saved me from a potential very bad situation. Driving up a mountain pass, my TPMS alerted me that one of the tires on my toad dropped pressure quickly. I pulled off the side to discover a flat on one of the front tires. Had I kept going any number of things could have happened including a fire from toad jumping to DP engine. I wouldn’t drive without one.
I also have benefited over the years from having my system. The first time an alert sounded for one of my trailer tires just as we approached a rest area. It was a valve stem failure so I had a good safe secure place to change the tire out. The second time was on a U.S. highway in Alabama and the timing was perfect because if I wouldn't have gotten the alert when I did then I would have been past the area with large shoulders and center cross-overs, again providing me with a good place to safely address the issue. Both of these situations also prevent me from continuing on flat tires and having them come apart and tearing up my equipment.
 
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